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Talk To Frank

What Is Talk To Frank?

Converse with Frank is the extensive running anti-drug movement the UK has had. But, have people quit drug abuse through this?

A decade ago a police SWAT team slammed into a peaceful kitchen somewhere in the suburbs and modified the image of drugs education in the United Kingdom for always. Cautions of how drugs could cause you to become disturbed and impassioned calls to say no to the menacing pushers skulking in every single playground disappeared. In came strange humour and a light, yet energetic approach.


In the first ad, a mother suggests to her teenage son that they have a chat about drugs so he calls the police snatch squad. The message delivered by the advert had not been heard before either: "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank: A Pleasant Private Drug Counsel

One can actually say that Frank which was a brain child of "Mother" ad firm became the new National Drugs Helpline It was supposed to be the symbol of a reliable older brother that younger individuals can go to for guidance regarding illegal substances. The quests of Pablo, the dog that's used as a substance mule, to a tour around a brain warehouse have been put forward under the Frank name, making it a well-known trade name amongst the youth of the nation.


According to Justin Tindal, the creative director of Leo Burnett the ad agency, what is of more importance is the fact that no-one ever saw Frank physically, so it was difficult for mockers to pick on him or blame him for not treating the kids right. Many people have high regard for the YouTube spoof videos of Frank too. As there is nothing that remotely suggests Frank is a government project, the campaign is viewed as a first occurrence funded by the government.

Substance education has developed a lot since Nancy Reagan, and in the United Kingdom, Grange Hill cast encouraged teens to simply "Say No" to drugs, a campaign which several professionals now think had the opposite of the desire effect.


Most promotions in Europe now concentrate, similar to Frank, on attempting to give fair-minded data to help youngsters settle on their own choices. In nations with solid punishments for ownership, pictures of jail bars and disgraced guardians are still typical. You play, you pay. is the ad used to warn young people going for night clubbing in Singapore.

Above the Influence, which is an ad that has lasted for a very long time to encourage young people to seek for alternatives to drugs, and which has gulped the UK government some huge amount of money combine caution and humour. In the ad, teenagers are communicated to in a manner they are familiar with, like some "stoners" being marooned on a couch. Around the world, a good number of anti-drug campaigns still use the scare tricks of old, "descent into hell," being one of the most used. A classic illustration is a current Canadian business, part of the DrugsNot4Me arrangement, which demonstrates an appealing, sure young lady's change into a shuddering and hollow eyed smash-up on account of "drugs."

Inquire about into a UK anti-drugs movements in the vicinity of 1999 and 2004 proposes promotions demonstrating the antagonistic impacts of medication mishandle can regularly empower youngsters "on the edges of society" to explore different avenues regarding drugs.


Frank broke new ground and was abundantly critiqued by opposed Conservative politicians at the while for setting out to propose that drugs may offer highs in addition to lows.


One primary online promotion educated viewers: "Cocaine makes you feel high and in charge."

It wasn't at all times simple to balance the message correctly. Matt Powell, the man behind the cocaine advertisement and then creative director of the digital agency, Profero, currently thinks he formed a too favourable estimate of the attention span of the typical person who browses the Internet. The negative effects were given at the end of the animated ad and some viewers might not have watched the whole thing. However, the goal of the ad was to be upfront with young people about the effects of drugs so that Frank could establish some accountability.

According to the Home Office, up to 67% of teenagers preferred to talk to Frank if drug advice becomes necessary. 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. It's confirmed, it contends, that the method works.

Though the response is good, it is no evidence that Frank just like other available anti-drug campaigns has discouraged people from indulging in drugs.

More than 9% drop has been witnessed in the country since the campaign came into place, but a drop in the use of cannabis has been given as an explanation for this, probably because teenagers are changing their approach towards tobacco smoking.


Frank - What Is It?

FRANK is a national drug education program that was established at the Home Office of the British Government and the Department of Health in 2003. It's supposed to reduce the use of illegal and legal substances by teaching teens about the possible effects of alcohol and drugs. Several media campaigns on the web and on radio have been put out by this programme.


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Services

Available services at FRANK for those who seek help about drugs include:

  • A website
  • A 24 hour telephone line that is strictly confidential
  • Email
  • A confidential live chat every day from 2 pm - 6 pm
  • A service to locate counselling and treatment